Medical Care ,  Health & Wellness ,  News & Innovation ,  Cardiology (Heart)

AI can diagnose heart disease simply by scanning eye

January 18, 2023

It’s a quick, accurate, and non-invasive test procedure


AI can diagnose heart disease simply by scanning eye

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that can determine a person’s risk of heart disease in under a minute via a retinal scan.

The innovative approach will empower ophthalmologists and optometrists to conduct cardiovascular screening using AI-enabled camera devices without resorting to conventionaltests, such as full blood analysis and blood pressure measurements. Moreover, the test can be performed anywhere.

Dr Alicja Rudnicka, who authored the study, stated that AI applications in diagnostics enabled early medical intervention that could improve cardiovascular health and save lives. People found to have a high risk of developing heart problems could take statins, medication to lower cholesterol in the blood, or undergo another intervention, the professor of statistical epidemiology at St George’s, University of London told the Guardian.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and causes one in four deaths in the United Kingdom alone.
To help meet the need for early detection, researchers developed the Quantitative Analysis of Retinal Vessels Topology and Size (QUARTZ), an AI-powered tool
that evaluates retinal vasculature imaging and traditional risk variables in making prognoses about vascular healthand mortality. They also concluded that the retinal data model computed by QUARTZ displayed similar predictive performance to established CVD assessment methods, such as the Framingham clinical risk score.

“AI-enabled vasculometry risk prediction is fully automated, low cost, non-invasive and has the potential for reaching a higher proportion of the population in the
community because of ‘high street’ availability and because blood sampling or sphygmomanometry are not needed,” the researchers wrote in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Related Articles

Health & Wellness

How to Deal with Obesity & Diabetes?

The prevalence of obesity in the world have continued to increase significantly. It is estimated by WHO that 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2016, and 13% were obese.

Read more
Medical Care

Blood delivery drone due to become world’s fastest

New-generation drones slash delivery time of life-saving blood products and medicines in hard-to-reach areas in Rwanda

Read more
Medical Care

Better use your nose

In the long term, mouth breathing might lead to several complications

Read more

Latest Articles

Health & Wellness

Increase Hair Growth and Strength

Keratin and dead skin cells make up hair. While there is no immediate technique to help your hair grow quicker, there are things you can do to keep it healthy and long.

Read more
Health & Wellness

Fibroids, Cysts and Everything in Between

While common amongst women, the differences between mostly asymptomatic conditions such as fibroids and cysts may not be clear to patients

Read more
Medical Care

Winning the Battle Against This Lifestyle Disease

Diabetes was first used by Aretaeus of Cappadocia in the 2nd Century AD. Diabetes originates from the Greek word meaning “siphon” (because the fluid does not remain in the body, but uses the man’s body as a channel whereby to leave it)

Read more
Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2015 - 2020. All rights reserved.